News Blog for Seattle's Wallingford Neighborhood

 

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When do you go to an urgent care rather than an ER?

May 6th, 2018 by sarawilly

Sponsored post by MultiCare Indigo Urgent Care.

It’s Saturday. You’ve just returned from your 8-year-old’s soccer game. Her foot, which she landed on awkwardly during today’s game, is swollen and she’s clearly in pain.

Do you go to the ER or urgent care?

We get that question almost daily at MultiCare Indigo Urgent Care in Wallingford. We can help.

Think of urgent care as the place to go for minor illnesses and injuries such as:

Illness and Injuries treated at Indigo Urgent Care in Wallingford
Illnesses                             Injuries
Allergies                              Minor burns
Bronchitis                            Bee sting
Coughs, colds                     Cuts, scrapes
Ear Infection                       Sprains, strains and minor fractures
Flu                                         Stitches
Sinus Infection                   Sports physicals, preparticipation physical (not an injury, but
UTI                                      regularly offered at all Indigo Urgent Cares)

The ER is the place to go for serious illnesses and injuries — a heart attack, stroke, difficulty breathing or a fracture that’s broken through the skin, to name just a few.

It’s also important to know that an urgent care costs less, sometimes as little as a doctor’s office copay — depending, of course, on your insurance plan.

At Wallingford’s Indigo Urgent Care, we’re ready to treat all of the illnesses and injuries listed in the chart above and your soccer player’s sprain or minor fracture. See our website indigourgentcare.com for a complete list of services.

And, because we were designed for busy families and people who value same-day care, we’ve created an urgent care that offers you care focused solely on you — and we get you in and out, quickly, without sacrificing your care or time spent with the doctor.

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Blood needed

May 2nd, 2018 by sarawilly

Bloodworks Northwest has issued an urgent appeal for blood donors. Inventories have dipped to critical levels due to consecutive weeks of Spring break vacations and a very early Easter holiday. There is a special need for O blood type and platelets, but all types are welcomed. Type O negative blood is the universal blood type that can be transfused to any patient suffering from trauma when they are rushed to a hospital and there is no time to type their blood.

Donating blood takes less an hour, and because blood can be broken down into its three components each donation can potentially save three lives.

Further details and a list of Bloodworks Northwest donor centers are in the release below. Appointments to donate can be scheduled at schedule.bloodworksnw.org, or by calling 1-800-398-7888.

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THE SEATTLE PUBLIC LIBRARY WANTS TO HEAR FROM YOU!

April 27th, 2018 by sarawilly

Tell the Library what resources you value most, and what services could be improved by completing a survey available Wednesday, now through Friday, May 25, 2018. Visit the Library’s website here to access the survey online, or visit your local branch to complete a paper copy. The survey is available in English, Spanish, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Mandarin, Somali, Vietnamese, Tagalog and Korean. Survey responses will help guide the Library’s service planning and decision-making.
It’s been nearly eight years since the Library has surveyed Seattle residents to see how current operations align with public needs and expectations. Information from the 2010 Library survey led to enhancements in the collection of books and materials, more computer technology, expanded Library hours and more.
“A lot has changed in our community since 2010, and it is important to ask residents if our services and resources are addressing their needs,” said Chief Librarian Marcellus Turner. Turner said in addition to offering an expansive print and digital collection, the Library offers nearly 10,000 annual educational classes, cultural programs and services, including tax help, health care enrollment, homework tutoring, citizenship preparation, Wi-Fi hotspot lending to tent cities, social service referrals and more.
For more information about the Library or survey, Ask Us.

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Free home retrofit class: Saturday April 21, from 11:30-1:30

April 18th, 2018 by sarawilly

Help reduce damage caused during an earthquake. Learn to become an informed consumer or how to do home retrofit yourself. Retrofit experts will show how to assess your home’s needs and how to use the City of Seattle’s pre-engineered Home Retrofit plans to permit and retrofit your home.

Prior to 1980, building codes did not require builders to secure houses to their foundations. This does not mean that every house built before 1980 is “unsecured”, only that it was not a requirement. If your home is not properly secured, it may be at increased risk of “slipping” off the foundation during a major earthquake. Retrofitting involves bolting your home to its foundation and providing sheer/pony wall strength.

Click here to register-space is limited.

 

Click here for more information, or email:snap@seattle.gov

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Woodland Park Zoo now part of Seattle Public Library’s Museum Pass Program

April 11th, 2018 by sarawilly

From Doree at our sister site phinneywood

Woodland Park Zoo recently joined The Seattle Public Library’s Museum Pass program, which gives Library cardholders free admission to 16 Seattle museum and cultural organizations.

Each day 50 zoo passes will be available. Each pass allows up to four people ages 3 and up to access the zoo for free during regular business hours (children 2 and under are always free).

Library cardholders can reserve one free Museum Pass per week. Each Museum Pass provides admission for at least two adults — some passes allow more, and may include free admission for kids ages 17 and under. You can sign up for a pass to a specific organization once every 30 days.

The program reservation system requires you to enter your Library card number and personal identification number (PIN), then choose a specific date and print the museum pass. To read more details and reserve a museum pass, visit www.spl.org/museumpass.

Other participating organizations include: The Burke Museum, The Center for Wooden Boats, Flying Heritage Collection, Henry Art Gallery, Living Computers: Museum + Lab, The Log House Museum, MoPOP, Museum of Flight, Museum of History & Industry, Nordic Heritage Museum, Northwest African American Museum, Seattle Art Museum, Seattle Aquarium, Seattle Public Theater, and Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience.

The Museum Pass program is sponsored by The Seattle Public Library Foundation.

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Sponsored post: Allergies or a Sinus Infection?

April 3rd, 2018 by sarawilly

Sponsored post written by MultiCare Indigo Urgent Care – Wallingford

The rain is warmer. The days are longer. The weeds are blooming.

And, yes, your nasal passages are swollen.

If you’re like many of us, spring allergies are as predictable as rain in Seattle. But at Indigo Urgent Care in Wallingford, we frequently hear this question: Is it allergies or a sinus infection?

Swollen nasal passages and trouble breathing through your nose is a common allergy symptom. If an over-the-counter allergy medicine such as Zyrtec improves your symptoms, chances are you’re suffering from spring allergies.

In other cases, these symptoms continue — and don’t magically disappear with medications or a saline rinse — but they don’t get worse, either. Spoiler alert: your symptoms are likely spring allergies, too.

But what if your symptoms are worse — aching in your upper jaw or teeth, cough, throbbing facial pain and/or a fever? These could be signs of something worse.

If your symptoms don’t improve after 10-14 days, you may be suffering from a sinus infection or chronic sinusitis.

If you can’t see your regular doctor or these symptoms grow worse over the weekend, we invite you to visit us at MultiCare Indigo Urgent Care in Wallingford.

Here, you’ll find friendly, helpful staff, able to see you from 8 am to 8 pm every day of the week, including holidays. We’ve also designed our bright, modern clinics to focus on what’s important to you — quick, convenient care, without the wait.

Schedule a visit online or walk in any day — we’ll get you in and out in 45 minutes or less.

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Zoo mourns the sudden passing of gorilla Leo

April 3rd, 2018 by sarawilly

Photo credit  Dennis Dow/Woodland Park Zoo

A male gorilla fondly called Leo, passed away last week at age 40 after a brief illness. The upper middle-age gorilla had been under a 24-hour care this week. He died in his off-view sleeping den.
Last Monday, the 360-pound gorilla had no interest in food or drink, and did not want to leave his den to go outdoors. The zoo’s animal health team did a visual assessment and a 24-hour treatment plan that included medications, hydration, hand feeding and observation. Plans to anesthetize him for a diagnostic exam were canceled because Leo had shown significant signs of improvement. “Leo drank and ate a lot and urinated, a positive sign of hydration. Also, his activity levels increased and we even observed play behavior, so we believed he was on the mend,” said Nancy Hawkes, PhD, Woodland Park Zoo’s director of animal care. “We continued monitoring him overnight. Unfortunately, he died suddenly in the presence of one of his gorilla keepers and close proximity to his family without any warning.”

Leo was the silverback (adult male leader) of his group: 22-year-old female Nadiri; 2-year-old female Yola, daughter of Nadiri; and 16-year-old female Akenji. Leo’s body was kept overnight at the gorilla building so his family and animal keepers could be with him. Gorillas are social animals, explained Hawkes. “This is a devastating loss for Leo’s family, our gorilla keepers and our zoo family. We’re shocked by his sudden death and will provide extra support and TLC for his family group. This is a very difficult time for our staff and volunteers.”

For the immediate future, Nadiri, Yola and Akenji will continue to be in the outdoor exhibit during zoo hours.

The median life expectancy for male western lowland gorillas is 32 years old, although gorillas in zoos can live in to their 40s and 50s because of the evolving field of zoo medicine including improved husbandry and management techniques, excellent animal care, better nutrition, increased medical knowledge, and diagnostic and therapeutic techniques.

As a standard procedure, the zoo’s animal health team will perform a necropsy (an animal autopsy) to determine the cause of death and to share the results nationally among scientific colleagues to help advance the understanding of medical issues in gorillas, explained Dr. Darin Collins, Woodland Park Zoo’s director of animal health. The cause of death is pending final pathology tests in several weeks.

Leo’s rise to becoming a leader in a cohesive group and a surrogate father to Yola is an incredible story. Leo moved to Woodland Park Zoo in 2008 and, because of the incredibly dedicated team of compassionate and determined gorilla keepers, he was successfully socialized into his existing family, and respected and loved. Read Leo’s extraordinary story here.

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School walkouts this morning

March 14th, 2018 by sarawilly

A walkout is planned this morning in many Seattle schools, to protest Congress’ reaction to gun violence in schools, exactly one month after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.

Students from thousands of schools across the country will leave their classes at 10am, and remain out for 17 minutes, one minute to honor each student killed during the shooting.

The walkouts are organized by students.

This map shows which schools are participating in the Seattle area. On March 24, all are invited to participate in March For Our Lives, which begins at Cal Anderson Park at 10 am. and ends at Key Arena.

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Traffic impacts on Sand Point Way N.E. at N.E. Windermere Road for sewer pipe repair

March 6th, 2018 by sarawilly

Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) contractor crews will be repairing a sewer pipe at the intersection of Sand Point Way N.E. and N.E. Windermere Road.

Work is scheduled to begin Tuesday, March 6 and should take a day or less to complete. Construction at this site is weather dependent and may be rescheduled in the event of possible wet weather. Work hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Both roads will remain fully open during non-work hours and peak travel times.

When work is occurring, the southbound curbside lane of Sand Point Way N.E. will be closed near the work area and N.E. Windermere Road may have lane restrictions near the intersection with Sand Point Way N.E. Residents and commuters may experience traffic delays and parking restrictions. SPU contractor crews will provide access to businesses during construction.

Learn more about Seattle Public Utilities here.

Seattle Public Utilities provides essential services. We deliver pure mountain drinking water, recycling and composting that lead the nation, and sewer and drainage systems to protect our local waterways. These services safeguard your health and our shared environment, and help keep Seattle the best place to live.

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Library Closure

February 23rd, 2018 by sarawilly

The Central Library and all branches of The Seattle Public Library will be closed on Wednesday, March 7, 2018, for a staff in-service day. The Central Library book drop will be closed. All branch book drops will remain open. No Library material will be due on that day. All branch library parking garages will be closed, but the Central Library garage at 1000 Fourth Ave. will be open. Regular operating hours will resume on Thursday, March 8.
For more information, call the Library at 206-386-4636 or Ask a Librarian.

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