News Blog for Seattle's Wallingford Neighborhood

 

Senior centers to get $1.7M from city

September 20th, 2018 · No Comments

Mayor Jenny A. Durkan announced $1.7 million in awards for senior centers that contribute to the health, well-being, and independence of Seattle’s older adults.

“As our City grows less affordable, we must continue to invest in our most vulnerable residents, including our senior community. Our older neighbors are an asset to our community and a vital part of the fabric of our neighborhoods,” said Mayor Durkan. “Our senior centers provide opportunities for volunteerism, lifelong learning, transportation, and healthy meals. These investments will help our neighbors live longer and enhance their quality of life.”

Twelve nonprofit centers across Seattle will receive awards ranging from $67,000 to $180,000 in 2019, including:

  • Asian Counseling and Referral Service
  • Chinese Information and Service Center
  • International Drop-In Center
  • Greenwood Senior Center (operated by the Phinney Neighborhood Association)
  • Pike Market Senior Center
  • South Park Senior Center
  • Southeast Seattle Senior Center
  • Wallingford Community Senior Center

And four programs operated by Sound Generations:

  • Ballard Senior Center
  • Central Area Senior Center
  • Lake City/Northgate
  • Senior Center of West Seattle

“HSD has developed a results-driven investment model that helps ensure that the department’s work is making a real difference in the lives of vulnerable people, addressing community disparities, and investing in what works,” said Jason Johnson, Interim Director of the Human Services Department. “These centers provide high-quality, cost-effective programs. They reach out to older people who may be socially or culturally isolated and they build a real sense of community.”

The Seattle Human Services Department recommended the senior center awards from the City’s General Fund. Its Aging and Disability Services division reviewed center proposals and made final decisions based on recommendations from a community-based review committee, the geographic location of the center, and the opportunity to serve populations with higher health disparities and/or lower social and emotional support, particularly Hispanic/Latinx and Black/African American older adults.

Several studies show the connection between social engagement, quality of life, and longevity. AARP Foundation’s Connect2Affect lists numerous risk factors for older adults, including diminishing social networks, fewer transportation options, changing roles, and living alone. Social and civic participation and community support are among the goals of the City of Seattle’s Age Friendly Seattle action plan.

For senior center locations, more information about local programs and services for older adults, or answers to questions about aging issues, call Community Living Connections toll-free at 844-348-5464.

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