News Blog for Seattle's Wallingford Neighborhood

 

Satay news: Food Network show, trivia, more

June 9th, 2011 by master

Wallingford’s only Malaysian restaurant, Satay (1711 N. 45th St.), will be known nationally in a few weeks for its namesake dish.  On June 27 at 10:00 p.m. The Food Network will be air an episode devoted to “Meat on a Stick” on its new show “Meat and Potatoes.” You may recall that the episode was shot back in March.

To celebrate, Satay will host a viewing party at the Phinney Neighborhood Association’s “Community Hall” (6532 Phinney Ave. N.) on the big screen from 9:45 to 11:00 p.m.  Everyone is invited to stop by. You can catch repeats of Satay’s Food Network appearance on Jun 28 at 1:00 a.m. and July 3 at 4:00 p.m.

Satay owners Peter Ringold and Patrick McCredie would also like patrons to know that the new back patio (it’s a lovely space shaded by mature trees), and that they’re hosing trivia night every Thursday at 7:30 p.m. for $2.00 per person. Ringold told us that trivia will run about an hour and have a visual round, an audio round, a current event round, as well as other changing categories.

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Wallingford's Asian restaurants among "Best"

January 26th, 2011 by master

Seattle Met magazine’s February issue focuses on “Best Asian Restaurants,” a category well represented in Wallingford.

These are the cuisines in which Wallingford restaurants were deemed among the best. Should you ever wish to leave Wallingford’s boundaries, read about Seattle’s other best Asian restaurants on the Seattle Met site.

Korean

Joule
Their menu is a cosmopolitan globetrotter, but Joule chef-owners Rachel Yang and Seif Chirchi infuse the food with signature Korean flavors—deep, dark, and dank as a Wallingford basement, with spicy pings of chili pepper running interference against funk overload.

Who’s here The whole dang neighborhood likes to cheer up inside this noisy, butter-hued cafe. Make a reservation.

Don’t miss The kooky kimchi remixes—pear, shiitake, kohlrabi—and the BBQ board where a grilled version of the fermented cabbage serves as crunchy vegetal counterpoint to sweet chili sausage and silken short ribs.

Pssst Yang and Chirchi are now having fun with their food in Fremont, too: Pan-Asian street food joint Revel opened on North 36th Street this December.

Joule, 1913 N 45th St, Wallingford, 206-632-1913; joulerestaurant.com

Malaysian

Satay
The story behind this brand new place is as good as the satay: Two college buddies backpack through Southeast Asia and develop an addiction to Malaysian street food. With the help of a Malay auntie, they recreate the scene—bright red walls graffitied with local lingo—and their favorite dishes, all under $10: curry puffs, roti canai, red curry, and the best satay in Seattle—crispy and juicy with homemade peanut sauce.

Who’s here Expats and scruffy backpackers reliving their days spent sucking down satay and Singha beer in a Kuala Lumpur alley.

Don’t miss The curry puffs—both the owners’ top pick and ours.

Pssst There are only a handful of tables, so consider grabbing takeout or getting a stool at the counter.

Satay, 1711 N 45th St, Wallingford, 206-547-0597; satayseattle.com

Sushi

Kisaku
Warm and sweet as the inside of a yam, Kisaku offers the deep skill of sushi craftsman Ryuichi Nakano along with the sort of neighborhood hospitality that welcomes toddlers to the sushi bar. With shy grace Nakano-san presents an unusual diversity of seasonal delicacies—cod sperm sacs, green sea urchin—along with more usual suspects, then under-charges for them.

Who’s here Must be neighbors, because street parking in this Tangletown tangle is near nonexistent.

Don’t miss Sitting at the bar to enjoy Nakano-san’s selection in the form of chef’s choice omakase. Non–sushi eaters should order the mackerel in syrupy miso sauce, a revelation.

Pssst Nakano-san (@kisakusushi) tweets his daily fresh sheet!

Kisaku, 2101 N 55th St, Ste 100, Wallingford, 206-545-9050; kisaku.com/kisaku

Phad Thai (see sidebar)

The ornate Thai facade on 45th in Wallingford houses May Restaurant and Lounge, an inconsistent Thai restaurant with two mitigating claims to fame: a gently lovely filigreed-teak interior, and a phad Thai presentation to leave for dead every other pretender in town. Servers bring the noodles to your table wrapped in banana leaves, along with condiment dishes of sugar, peanuts, and chilies so you can season to your taste, then scatter the whole with a flourish of banana blossoms. Aside from being the prettiest rendition of the most ubiquitous Asian dish in Seattle, we’ll call it the tastiest, alive with all the right tarts and savories and sours and not a hint of that cloying ketchuppy tang we’ve come to expect.

May Restaurant and Lounge, 1612 N 45th St, Wallingford, 206-675-0037; maythaiseattle.com

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Malaysian restaurant Satay opens today

December 10th, 2010 by master

Today the white paper will come off the windows at 1711 N. 45th St., and Satay will open its doors to diners hungry to try Malaysian street food.

We stopped by yesterday to see how the restaurant has come together since we first talked with proprietors Peter Ringold and Patrick McCredie in September.

The colorful space, which features salvaged, naturally weathered corrugated metal wainscoting and photos of Malaysian street food scenes, is more casual that when Avila was in the space.

Diners will order at the register from a menu board hung from the ceiling. They’ll be called up to get their food.

Chef Travis Jennings is new to Malaysian cuisine, but he attended culinary school and is familiar with Asian cooking techniques and ingredients. He’ll replicate recipes that Ringold’s Malay aunt supplied to the restaurant. She tasted all the dishes from the small menu and gave them her approval: “You guys actually did it,” she said.

Satay is truly a family affair: Ringold’s cousin, a clothing designer, helped with the restaurant’s aesthetic. “We were going for a rustic chic look,” McCredie said.

The wood that frames the menu board was salvaged from a vintage Wallingford deck.

Satay will be open Monday to Saturday, 11:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.

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Malaysian restaurant Satay opens today

November 14th, 2010 by master

Today the white paper will come off the windows at 1711 N. 45th St., and Satay will open its doors to diners hungry to try Malaysian street food.

We stopped by yesterday to see how the restaurant has come together since we first talked with proprietors Peter Ringold and Patrick McCredie in September.

The colorful space, which features salvaged, naturally weathered corrugated metal wainscoting and photos of Malaysian street food scenes, is more casual that when Avila was in the space.

Diners will order at the register from a menu board hung from the ceiling. They’ll be called up to get their food.

Chef Travis Jennings is new to Malaysian cuisine, but he attended culinary school and is familiar with Asian cooking techniques and ingredients. He’ll replicate recipes that Ringold’s Malay aunt supplied to the restaurant. She tasted all the dishes from the small menu and gave them her approval: “You guys actually did it,” she said.

Satay is truly a family affair: Ringold’s cousin, a clothing designer, helped with the restaurant’s aesthetic. “We were going for a rustic chic look,” McCredie said.

The wood that frames the menu board was salvaged from a vintage Wallingford deck.

Satay will be open Monday to Saturday, 11:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.

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