News Blog for Seattle's Wallingford Neighborhood

 

Entries from April 2018

Free home retrofit class: Saturday April 21, from 11:30-1:30

April 18th, 2018 by sarawilly

Help reduce damage caused during an earthquake. Learn to become an informed consumer or how to do home retrofit yourself. Retrofit experts will show how to assess your home’s needs and how to use the City of Seattle’s pre-engineered Home Retrofit plans to permit and retrofit your home.

Prior to 1980, building codes did not require builders to secure houses to their foundations. This does not mean that every house built before 1980 is “unsecured”, only that it was not a requirement. If your home is not properly secured, it may be at increased risk of “slipping” off the foundation during a major earthquake. Retrofitting involves bolting your home to its foundation and providing sheer/pony wall strength.

Click here to register-space is limited.

 

Click here for more information, or email:snap@seattle.gov

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Woodland Park Zoo now part of Seattle Public Library’s Museum Pass Program

April 11th, 2018 by sarawilly

From Doree at our sister site phinneywood

Woodland Park Zoo recently joined The Seattle Public Library’s Museum Pass program, which gives Library cardholders free admission to 16 Seattle museum and cultural organizations.

Each day 50 zoo passes will be available. Each pass allows up to four people ages 3 and up to access the zoo for free during regular business hours (children 2 and under are always free).

Library cardholders can reserve one free Museum Pass per week. Each Museum Pass provides admission for at least two adults — some passes allow more, and may include free admission for kids ages 17 and under. You can sign up for a pass to a specific organization once every 30 days.

The program reservation system requires you to enter your Library card number and personal identification number (PIN), then choose a specific date and print the museum pass. To read more details and reserve a museum pass, visit www.spl.org/museumpass.

Other participating organizations include: The Burke Museum, The Center for Wooden Boats, Flying Heritage Collection, Henry Art Gallery, Living Computers: Museum + Lab, The Log House Museum, MoPOP, Museum of Flight, Museum of History & Industry, Nordic Heritage Museum, Northwest African American Museum, Seattle Art Museum, Seattle Aquarium, Seattle Public Theater, and Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience.

The Museum Pass program is sponsored by The Seattle Public Library Foundation.

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Sponsored post: Allergies or a Sinus Infection?

April 3rd, 2018 by sarawilly

Sponsored post written by MultiCare Indigo Urgent Care – Wallingford

The rain is warmer. The days are longer. The weeds are blooming.

And, yes, your nasal passages are swollen.

If you’re like many of us, spring allergies are as predictable as rain in Seattle. But at Indigo Urgent Care in Wallingford, we frequently hear this question: Is it allergies or a sinus infection?

Swollen nasal passages and trouble breathing through your nose is a common allergy symptom. If an over-the-counter allergy medicine such as Zyrtec improves your symptoms, chances are you’re suffering from spring allergies.

In other cases, these symptoms continue — and don’t magically disappear with medications or a saline rinse — but they don’t get worse, either. Spoiler alert: your symptoms are likely spring allergies, too.

But what if your symptoms are worse — aching in your upper jaw or teeth, cough, throbbing facial pain and/or a fever? These could be signs of something worse.

If your symptoms don’t improve after 10-14 days, you may be suffering from a sinus infection or chronic sinusitis.

If you can’t see your regular doctor or these symptoms grow worse over the weekend, we invite you to visit us at MultiCare Indigo Urgent Care in Wallingford.

Here, you’ll find friendly, helpful staff, able to see you from 8 am to 8 pm every day of the week, including holidays. We’ve also designed our bright, modern clinics to focus on what’s important to you — quick, convenient care, without the wait.

Schedule a visit online or walk in any day — we’ll get you in and out in 45 minutes or less.

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Zoo mourns the sudden passing of gorilla Leo

April 3rd, 2018 by sarawilly

Photo credit  Dennis Dow/Woodland Park Zoo

A male gorilla fondly called Leo, passed away last week at age 40 after a brief illness. The upper middle-age gorilla had been under a 24-hour care this week. He died in his off-view sleeping den.
Last Monday, the 360-pound gorilla had no interest in food or drink, and did not want to leave his den to go outdoors. The zoo’s animal health team did a visual assessment and a 24-hour treatment plan that included medications, hydration, hand feeding and observation. Plans to anesthetize him for a diagnostic exam were canceled because Leo had shown significant signs of improvement. “Leo drank and ate a lot and urinated, a positive sign of hydration. Also, his activity levels increased and we even observed play behavior, so we believed he was on the mend,” said Nancy Hawkes, PhD, Woodland Park Zoo’s director of animal care. “We continued monitoring him overnight. Unfortunately, he died suddenly in the presence of one of his gorilla keepers and close proximity to his family without any warning.”

Leo was the silverback (adult male leader) of his group: 22-year-old female Nadiri; 2-year-old female Yola, daughter of Nadiri; and 16-year-old female Akenji. Leo’s body was kept overnight at the gorilla building so his family and animal keepers could be with him. Gorillas are social animals, explained Hawkes. “This is a devastating loss for Leo’s family, our gorilla keepers and our zoo family. We’re shocked by his sudden death and will provide extra support and TLC for his family group. This is a very difficult time for our staff and volunteers.”

For the immediate future, Nadiri, Yola and Akenji will continue to be in the outdoor exhibit during zoo hours.

The median life expectancy for male western lowland gorillas is 32 years old, although gorillas in zoos can live in to their 40s and 50s because of the evolving field of zoo medicine including improved husbandry and management techniques, excellent animal care, better nutrition, increased medical knowledge, and diagnostic and therapeutic techniques.

As a standard procedure, the zoo’s animal health team will perform a necropsy (an animal autopsy) to determine the cause of death and to share the results nationally among scientific colleagues to help advance the understanding of medical issues in gorillas, explained Dr. Darin Collins, Woodland Park Zoo’s director of animal health. The cause of death is pending final pathology tests in several weeks.

Leo’s rise to becoming a leader in a cohesive group and a surrogate father to Yola is an incredible story. Leo moved to Woodland Park Zoo in 2008 and, because of the incredibly dedicated team of compassionate and determined gorilla keepers, he was successfully socialized into his existing family, and respected and loved. Read Leo’s extraordinary story here.

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